Lexifabricographer For when the right word just won’t do…

March 8, 2016

Back to the Island 3.5 – The Cost of Living

Filed under: back to the island,reviewage — Tags: — lexifab @ 10:45 pm

Quote – “What about Eko?” – Charlie Pace
“We’ll catch up. We’re all going to the same place.” – John Locke

Summary: A feverish Eko wanders into the jungle to confess his sins to the ghost of his brother, pursued by Locke and company. Ben and Juliet appeal to Jack to help them but to very different ends.

The Best Bit: The flashbacks to Eko’s Nigerian childhood and his brief, blood-soaked term as Brother Yemi’s successor is riddled with African clichés of murderous gangsters, pious villagers and poorly-managed Red Cross medical shipments, but it is beautifully crafted, acted and shot.

The Worst Bit: It seems mean to pick on Nikki and Paulo again, but for the most part there are no weak scenes here, so I’m going with the inexplicably weak gag of Paulo using a toilet when everyone else is being deadly serious.

Books: Nobody is reading, but Juliet name checks To Kill a Mockingbird in a scene where she pitches to jack that he murder Ben with surgery while ostensibly singing his praises. It’s a pretty tight scene, but it doesn’t have too much in common with Mockingbird. Neither does the rest of the plot – unlike Boo Radley, Mr Eko is neither innocent of his many crimes nor does he regret committing them.

The mythology: The Smoke Monster straight-up murders Eko here, immediately after his declaration that he does not repent his many sins. This is the first time we get a clear sense that there’s a link between the Island’s ghosts and the Smoke Monster, though the nature of their connection is not yet apparent. The killing also hints that the Smoke Monster is operating according to a moral framework – despite several opportunities, it does not kill Eko until he after asserts that he is proud of his decisions. Even the machete murder decisions. Or rather, especially those ones.

The episode: Another one bites the dust. Literally, this time, with Eko face-planted to death by the Smoke Monster. Adewale Akinnuoye-Agbaje decided he didn’t like living in Hawaii, which is a way better reason to get killed off from a TV show than being busted for DUI like some actors we could mention.

The A plot of “The Cost of Living” is thin, with Eko wandering about until he meets his brother, and the flashbacks to his violent past are arresting. But it’s Ben and Juliet’s silent war to control the Others through Jack that is the episode’s best material in retrospect, showing both Others to their best effect. Ben manipulates by telling the truth, while Juliet plots bloody treachery with fierce declarations of loyalty. It’s kind of beautiful, in a pre-Game of Thrones kind of way.

I give it eight daggers in Caesar’s back.

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