Lexifabricographer For when the right word just won't do…

October 6, 2015

Conflux is done for another year. Back to work.

Filed under: geekery,news of the day,wordsmithery — Tags: , , , , , — lexifab @ 3:41 pm

Everything came together on the weekend, which turned out to be more of a relief than I’d realised. I’d already figured out that between the overseas trip, the final preparations for Conflux, the end-of-year accounting for the CSFG’s finances and the launch of a new book all happening in the space of four weeks, any hope of having brain-cycles left over for writing was a complete bust.

That all done now, or almost so. The October long weekend saw Canberra’s speculative fiction writing convention Conflux 11 go off without any particularly significant hitches. This was my first year volunteering for the con organising committee (as the dealers’ room coordinator). It turns out I maaaaaaaaay have been carrying a little residual stress about making sure I covered every possible detail from every conceivable angle. By the time of the con’s launch on Friday morning, I was on my fourth consecutive morning of waking up at about 4 am with a to-do checklist running through my head. It’s a small miracle that I don’t seem to have spent the entire weekend responding to every single question with unintelligible blabbering.

No, I’m sure the blabbering was completely coherent.

The other big deal for the convention was the launch of the new CSFG anthology The Never Never Land. We had our official book launch on Sunday evening, with probably half the contributing authors in attendance. As we were still pulling together small details like collecting the print run and paying for the catering right up to the last minute, it was – as they say in showbiz – all right on the night. Shauna O’Meara (who did the gorgeous cover art) and Cat Sparks (who took this gallery of remarkable con photos – the TNNL launch ones are near the bottom of page 2) did readings from their excellent short stories, Nicole Murphy MC’ed and first-among-editorial-equals Ian McHugh gave thanks to the committee. I may have missed my name being mentioned because I was trying to skull a light beer before the bookselling started.

(I don’t have a story in Never Never, by the way. I started one but didn’t figure out how to finish it until about six months after the submissions closed).

And I didn’t get to see much of the convention, though I did sit in on a couple of quite remarkable panels. One was about managing your career as an author – which featured Isobelle Carmody extolling the virtues of a personal assistant, among other delights – and the other about what writers choose to sacrifice in order to have the space to write. Both were instructive as to the diversity of experiences on the path to success, however an individual may define it. I suppose that other panels might not have been quite as serious or thoughtful, but I counted myself lucky to catch the discussions I did.

And now it’s Tuesday, I’m back at work and I am flat out. I still have quite a bit of admin to tie up, both CSFG and convention-related, but excuse-time is up. I gotta get back on the word-pony and get some stuff done. I have at least another 3-4 chapters left to deal with on the novel. I have at least two short stories to finish and another two outlined that I could be writing. And I still haven’t set up my new author web page, despite having a bunch of stuff sitting ready to go for weeks now.

I think my next blogging job will be to review my 2015 goals and see how far behind I’ve fallen…



September 15, 2015

At the Edge anthology coming in 2016

Filed under: news of the day,wordsmithery — Tags: , , , — lexifab @ 2:53 pm

The news of the past day is leaving me with an acute case of advanced schadenfreude, so I’m not going to address it today. Instead I’ll turn to even happier (on a personal level) events.

One lovely bit of news that I’ve been sitting on for quite a while is that I have a new story coming out next year. The story is called “Seven Excerpts from Season One” and will appear in the 2016 anthology At the Edge from Paper Road Press in New Zealand. I won’t say too much about the story other than to vaguely describe it as my “Youtube high school ghost hunters” piece.

This planet has lovely sunsets. Mind the flying stingray monsters.

This planet has lovely sunsets. Mind the flying stingray monsters.

Quite apart from the sheer delight of getting accepted for publication, I am very excited to be sharing a table of contents again with my Brisbane writer-buddies Jodi Cleghorn and Tom Dullemond, who both also have work coming out (sooner or later) in The Lane of Unusual Traders. I love their stuff and can’t wait to read what they’ve done.

I’ll share more about At the Edge as information comes out. In the meantime, I plan to spend quite a lot of time admiring the lovely cover art from Wellington artist Emma Weakley.


July 13, 2015

Progress report – Bad ideas abound

In retrospect I should have realised that aiming to finish my novel in July would be a terrible idea. That’s the time of the year when I have to manage my abnormally complex tax affairs. Work’s never busier than around the end of financial year. There’s school holidays. I’m the treasurer of a club with non-trivial membership and assets. And – oh shit, I completely forgot that the Ashes are being played in the UK at relatively viewable times of the evening.

Thinking about that now, and making the observation – obvious with hindsight – that I tend to approach complex jobs (like writing a novel) with a foot-dragging air of desperate procrastination, I probably could have planned this better. As I should have expected, I’ve left myself with a fifteen to twenty-thousand word sprint to complete in the next two-and-change weeks.

That would be challenging enough, but on top of that the process of writing the novel has (also predictably) caused me to depart from my original outline in fairly significant ways. So now instead of racing towards the finish line on a well-mapped track with safety rails, I’m rallying about in the dark with dodgy headlights and a drunk navigator. I could still cross the finish line on time, but it’s difficult to see how it might happen on purpose.

Still, it is do-able, and I have something that at least resembles a plan. I will allocate at least part of every day – typically lunchtimes – to rebuilding the outline. That will help to make sure that when I sit down to write each session, I won’t have to spend a lot of time thinking about what the  scene will be about etc. And because the act of writing invariably steers me off-course with respect to the outline, I need to make sure that the re-outlining process occurs as regularly (or almost so) as the writing sessions themselves.

Currently I am writing at a rate of about 5000 words a week (on the novel). To get to where I want to be that number will have to rise to about 8000 a week.

I can do that.


In other news

I am currently reading Capital in the Twenty-First Century by Thomas Piketty for a couple of reasons: one, because the library sent me a recommendation to do so; two, because I know enough about economics to know what an economic illiterate I am and I do like to have a better grasp of why the world works as it does; and three, because I have let my non-fiction reading skills atrophy over the last few years and this looks like a serious workout in that respect. So far I am following it pretty well – Piketty takes the time to explain his terms and then remind the reader what they meant, but otherwise does not refrain from diving into fairly complex matters. It also helps that I am at least passingly familiar with the last three hundred years of European history, so I understand the basic context that he is examining. I’ll get back with a proper book report after I’m finished.

I know eight chords on the tenor ukelele now. Not all of them are single-finger chords. (Two of them are). While I can feel myself making good progress, I haven’t advanced to the point of trying to work out how to play an actual song yet. STILL I am being a musician again for the first time in more than ten years. Assuming it continues to feel good, at some point I will promote myself to learning to play the bass guitar (ie an instrument that does not sound terrible to play).

I devoted four late nights to the cricketing debacle in Cardiff last week (and would have thrown last night’s sleep into the mix as well had the Australian capitulation not be so complete). Even though the prospects are grim of a reversal of fortunes for the Lord’s Test starting on Thursday, I will be doing to same again this week. I fear that if even the lumbering doldrums displayed by the likes of Watson and Haddin cannot break my addiction to watching cricket, then my condition must be both acute and incurable.

July 6, 2015

Progress report – June was a stumbling block

Filed under: news of the day,wordsmithery — Tags: , , , — lexifab @ 3:57 pm

A quick update on the novel – progress was slow. I added about 10,000 words altogether for the entire month of June to the novel manuscript. By contrast, in the less-than-a-week since then, I’ve added about 5000 words. So it’s been a bit of a drag and a trample, but I feel like it won’t be impossible to climb back up on the horse.

I also finished a new short story – or rather an old one that I’ve been kicking back and forth for more than a year, drafting and redrafting. With the benefit of a couple of weeks’ distance, I’m quite proud of the story. I think it definitely represents a leveling up of my short story craft. I’m still well short of what I expect professional-quality writing to look like, but I’m confident that I’m inching closer to it.

As we’ve passed the halfway point for the year – which by the way, where the hell did those months go? – I decided to look in on the various writing goals I set for myself back in January and see how I’m going:

Short stories – I said I wanted to have ten stories in circulation. I currently have nine, though one is perilously close to retirement. I’m going to stay focused on getting the current draft of the novel completed as my first priority, but after that I intend to churn through a few of the short story ideas I’ve been putting together in the meantime. I thought back in January that the short story goal was a little unambitious. I’ll revise what I think is a more challenging goal after the novel draft is done.

Novel – The goal was to have an 80K novel written by the end of July. Right now the manuscript is a tad shy of 60,ooo words and I have 25 days to get to the goal. To be honest, I doubt I will quite make it, but if not I won’t be so far away that I end up disappointed in myself. A bit less than a thousand words a day is certainly doable, but it’s right near the upper end of my current productivity rates, so I am not going to beat myself up with unrealistic expectations.

Especially not when I have reached a point where I no longer know quite where this draft is going to end. I’ve gone off the reservation a bit in terms of my outline, and stuff is now happening that appears nowhere in my planning. I’ve yet to figure out whether I need to correct course and get back to what I was aiming at, or run with the new direction. I suspect the answer will be somewhere in the middle wearing a “Fix it in rewrites!” T-shirt. We’ll see.

Community stuff – I have to write a CSFG treasurer manual. I still haven’t done it, but to be honest it’s not that big a task. Now that the end of financial year has arrived, the first order of business is settling the accounts and getting them audited (well, that will be the second order of business after I do my own family taxes, which are a hefty job of work in themselves). I have a bit of a deadline around some upcoming holidays, so I will probably need to cram a lot of this into a short space of time. All the more reason to get the novel draft finished. But the auditing process will fill in a lot of the gaps in my knowledge on being a treasurer, so I expect to be in a good mental space for instruction manual writing as part of that.

Blogging – I am building the new writer website. It’s not done yet. I don’t regard it as a huge priority, what with having no particular work to promote, but the job hasn’t fallen off the list.


So that’s not too bad. I’m tracking pretty well against some admittedly modest goals, with some bursts of productivity needed in the near future. I can do that.

June 25, 2015

Progress report – Little to no progress to report

Filed under: geekery,wordsmithery — Tags: , , , , — lexifab @ 1:27 pm

In a shameless attempt to make sure that the entire month of June doesn’t pass without a blog entry, I will crank out a short progress report which only lightly touches on the status of the novel manuscript.

Because reasons, that’s why.

Status of the novel manuscript – It’s still going, albeit slowly. I’ve stalled a bit at the 50,000 word mark, having reached the point where the decision not to do any serious worldbuilding before I started has run aground on the lack of world. Er, so to speak. The external world, being little-defined, is exerting a sad lack of pressure on my isolated team of characters, which means I’m filling out an awful lot of word count with exposition and somewhat artificial interpersonal conflict. I have a suspicion that whole chapters in this area may disappear in the editing process. But not until after I finish the draft, dammit!

Short stories – Out of frustration with the slow progress on the novel, I’ve gone back to a couple of short stories to finish them off. “Burn the Future”, my “Hogwarts versus Aliens” story (not my description, but embarrassingly apt when someone proposed it) is now done and off on submission. “Unacceptable Losses” (aka “Golems versus Werewolves”, which *is* my shorthand description) was part-written in March when I dropped everything to start work on the novel. It has about another 1000 words left to be written, so I figured I would just knock them off as fast as possible so I can get to editing the piece.

Rejectomancy – So with the submission of BtF yesterday, I’m up to 31 submissions for the year with zero (I counted twice) acceptances. Ho hum. A couple of the pieces are on second readings at their respective venues, so they may well be in with a chance. And I have had some very encouraging “Good but not right for us” – type rejection letters, which is better than nothing.

One piece which has now gone out 21 times altogether is pretty much on its last possible sub, in that I’ve really just run out of markets to try to sell a 9000-word fantasy story to.  If it gets rejected again, which I’m expecting, I’ll reluctantly retire it and plonk it up here so everyone can point and laugh and wonder what got into me. Or I’ll add another seventy thousand words to it and convert it to a novel, maybe.


And in other news, I saw Inside Out, the new Pixar movie yesterday, about which I have two observations:

1) I reckon I learned more about neurosychology in that ninety minutes than I got in an entire year of first-year Psych at uni; and

2) I do a lot of quiet sobbing in Pixar movies.

It’s good. You should go sob – I mean, see it.

May 11, 2015

Progress Report – The sticky middle

Filed under: Uncategorized,wordsmithery — Tags: , , , — lexifab @ 12:18 pm

I’m a writer. I am, really.

Only, I’ve barely written a word in the last fortnight. Since Easter weekend – a month ago – I’ve written maybe five thousand words on A Flash of Black Wings. But really, if I were to look at my spreadsheet, I would probably be forced to acknowledge that it’s not even that much.

I put the intial problem down to bad timing. The expected disruption over Easter coincided with the part of my outline that has the vaguest plot points (“there’s an attack by mysterious people”, “our heroes go from here to there, encountering difficulties”). Up until that point in the writing process, I had a pretty firm idea of what was going on, even as my plot-as-written was becoming more complicated than the outline-as-planned.

Then I had to make some decisions. Uh oh. Decisions are NOT my strong point. I am an Olympic-level indecisionist.

I’m stalled on a plot point, being roughly “how do I move the characters from their current predicament through an exciting and essential action scene to the next phase of the story without completely breaking my own suspension of disbelief?” I need them to be somewhere else, but I’ve trapped them in a situation that it makes no sense to escape.

Agh. Structure is hard.

The solution, as far as I can see through the fog of self-doubt, is to just hammer out the scenes I need. Regardless of whether the scenes are justified by or even follow logically from what’s gone before, I need a complete draft. Once I’m finished, I will have something to edit.

That’s the lesson that this novel is teaching me all over again – finish the thing first, edit the thing later. Don’t edit it while you’re writing it.

My own process baffles me sometimes. A big part of the whinging I do on this blog is just trying to figure out how my own brain works and why I keep getting in my own way. And hopefully using the latest insights as a launchpad for resketching my internal road map (to mix my metaphors into a grotesque and unpalatable word-gruel).

So, a plan:

1) Keep writing. I need to get my streak back, because the write-every-day model is one that clealrly works for me. But on the other hand I also need to lower my expectations of my own productivity. When I was at full flight, I was writing an average of 750 words a day. Until I get back into the habit of daily writing, I should accept that 400-500 (a bit over a half-hour’s work for me, typically) is more reasonable.

2) Rework my outline. This is the job I’ve been putting off and putting off (see indecisiveness above) but I really can’t avoid it. My outline doesn’t work any more and I really don’t think I can end the novel where I was planning to. Too many characters have developed in directions that pull against the ending I’ve been aiming at, and I doubt I can get them back there without breaking them. So I need to redraw the map and see where I’m going (or if I need to kill someone I wasn’t planning to kill)

2) Mix it up. I have that half-edited short story (formerly known as “School Hall”) I was talking about above, plus another one that’s about a thousand words from a complete draft, plus another one that needs a rewrite, plus another one that’s been outlined in detail, not to mention a couple of others that are ready to start writing. Except for the “School Hall” edits, I was pretty determined to put off everything else until I finished my novel draft. But I think now that it would help if I have another project or two in my back pocket, for the (inevitable) times when I get really stuck and/or disillusioned with A Flash of Black wings. It’s bound to happen again, and better that I be working on something that wallowing in self-doubt and indecision for the better part of a month.

And with that, I’ll go back to the draft and hammer that bastard into submission.

April 12, 2015

Progress report – The streak is dead. Long live the streak.

Filed under: fitter/happier,wordsmithery — Tags: , , — lexifab @ 12:12 pm

My writing streak is broken. I didn’t write a word over the Easter long weekend.

I don’t regret that one bit. I had a lovely relaxing weekend in the company of good friends and loud children, eating ridiculously delicious food and playing games. I finished reading a book that I liked and admired (Andrea K Höst’s The Pyramids of London – review incoming).

Then on Wednesday I had my very first ever migraine, which was – well, let’s just say that I know a few chronic migraine sufferers and I have a newfound respect for their ability to function at all. It’s five days after my attack and I still feel like warmed-over garbage.

However, that’s by the wayside (I hope). It seems a good time to review where I’m at with the novel, now that I’ve completed a distinct block of work.

Up until the 2nd of April, the A Flash of Black Wings manuscript was sitting on 31500 words or so. I’ve managed another couple of quick sessions since then that have dragged it up to nearly 33K. The writing streak that produced that wordcount took place over 43 days, at an average of 730-odd words per day.

I’m fairly satisfied with that as an overall result, although I am conscious that I can easily produce about 400 words in a half-hour block, which points to the fact that I am not exactly putting in stellar hours to get the project finished. I try not to beat myself up about the numbers, but the time could definitely stand to do some work.

What have I learned so far?

1) Working from a loose outline definitely helps to improve my productivity. Even though I am continuously stopping to think about how the characters should respond to situations, to make up some new bit of setting detail to dress a scene and to craft halfway decent dialogue, it helps to know where I have to start and end with a chapter.

2) Having an outline is no protection against meandering. I still write a lot of unnecessary fluff. In the middle of scenes I have often found, as mentioned above, that I need to make up some detail in order to give a scene a sense of place or to address some plot point or give context to a line of dialogue. I usually respond to this by writing a paragraph or two of info-dump setting material that has no useful function in the scene I’m writing. It’s stuff that’s necessary for me to understand my own world and characters, but it drags the hell out of the scene in play. In the editing phase I’m going to be needing to lift a lot of chunks of text like this out and either discard them or find a more appropriate home for them. I guess I could address a lot of this by doing better planning up front, but that’s a lesson for the next book, not this one.

3) Having an outline is no protection against rampant imagination. One of the big complaints you hear a lot from born pantsers (like me) is that writing the whole story out ahead of time kills the creative process. That knowing where the story is going and how it will end takes all the fun out of the journey. That was one of the things I was quietly experimenting with on this project – whether working from a detailed outline would leave me feeling bored or uninspired.

It turns out that during the writing process an entire new plot thread has emerged which completely changes the context of the characters and the situation. This plot thread was not in any way a part of the original outline. It just came out as part of giving a minor character a bit of background depth, and evolved into a core part of the situation. It’s too compelling not to use, even though it ramps up the complexity of the story in ways I haven’t quite figured out how to deal with yet.

4) Outlining is an iterative process. With the new plotline insinuating itself into my otherwise simple survival-chase romp adventure, I probably have to go back to my outline and do some more work to figure out how it all fits together now. I am tempted to run with the change in direction for a little while to see where it’s heading, but there’s a danger of chasing the new plot down a rabbit hole and having to throw away large chunks of work (which I am utterly loathe to do). So I think that for the next week my aim will be to complete the scenes I am writing now, and take a fresh pass through the outline to rework the structure and see whether it will survive the invasion of the alien plot [1].


[1] Plot does not contain actual aliens, depending on your definition.

March 20, 2015

Progress report – A month of novelling

Filed under: wordsmithery — Tags: , — lexifab @ 11:40 am

So today marks four weeks since I started work on my novel. Things are going pretty well so far – I passed the 20,000 word mark a couple of days ago, averaging a touch over 700 words a day. I’ve written every day, a minimum of 500 words. Only once in all that time have I achieved four figues in a single writing day, and I’m pretty sure (without having my spreadsheet to hand) that I managed that on a weekend across about three writing sessions. Mostly the writing does not start until after the kids are in bed, so 8:30 pm at the earliest. I’d love to be a first-thing-in-the-morning writer, but it would probably require getting up at 4:30 or so to fit in with the rest of the house’s schedule, and I can’t bring myself to start down that road just yet.

Once again, the writing streak is working for me. I’ve written every day, without fail. Last night, I procrastinated and dithered until well past the point where it became silly (it was very hot and stuffy in Canberra and I was really feeling it), but fear and disdain for breaking my writing streak meant that I eventually sat down and cranked out the words. I wrote exactly 500 words of story, as well as some notes for my next writing session.

Often I need to remind myself that it actually feels good to write once I get started. I’m a dreadful procrastinator (I may have discussed this at length in the past). I’ll make cups of tea, pay bills, burn CDs – anything to get out of starting work. If you see me tweeting up a storm of an evening, you can be pretty confident that I’m sitting in front of the computer with a Scrivener tab open (and pushed to the back).

Anyway – where’s the novel at? I’ve got through four chapters of about 5000 words each and closed out what I think of as the first act (although structurally that might not be quite right). My main character is starting to firm up in my head, and the secondary characters are coming to the fore in lots of intriguing and unexpected ways. An interesting subplot has emerged that was not present in the original outline, one that may need careful management or reining in because it’s probably a bit of a post-apocalyptic YA cliche (and the novel itself is a post-apocalyptic YA story, though not necessarily in the sense that the term is usually used).

A problem is looming in that my primary antagonist is only just coming forward in what is the start of the second act, which is probably too late for her to make the required impact (I’ll know for sure soon, because the next scene I will write is the first confrontation between my POV character and her nemesis-to-be). I suspect that I will need to rewrite the first couple of chapters to establish a couple of characters early, so that when they are off-stage for a few chapters their presence will still be felt. I should have known all this befiore I started, but sometimes strucutral weaknesses only emerge in the construction phase.

(Architecture is not my core competency, obviously).

At some point fairly soon I expect to have to revisit my outline and rework the latter chapters. It’s looking a lot like I’ve distributed the story load a bit unevenly (architecture!) and may have put too much of the action at the start and end. The middle is looking – not boring, exactly, but perhaps the stakes are a little too low and inconsequential considering what comes befoer and after. It’s also possible that the end point I have been working towards is not the right one for this book (which is the first volume in a trilogy).


Oh, the the thing I discovered is that I can’t count. 500 words a day for 90 days does not, as it turns out, add up to 75,000 words. I don’t know what the hell I was thinking when I did my first estimates. It’s going to take four months to get this done, not three – although at the current rate of output, it should not be any longer than that.

As long as I don’t break my streak, that is.

February 20, 2015

Timestamp – ‘A Flash of Black Wings’ started

Filed under: news of the day,wordsmithery — Tags: , — lexifab @ 1:03 pm

Alert – Self-accountability post.

Hoo boy. I’ve jumped early. As of 11 pm yesterday, I am once again officially writing a novel. With a working title of ‘A Flash of Black Wings’ (which I very much doubt will survive the writing process), it will be a young adult-ish science fiction survival-action story of between 80 and 90 thousand words. Well, that’s what’s planned, anyway.

Saying that I’m just starting now is slightly disingenuous, mind you. I have been planning this novel in some detail for about a year now, working out the storyline chapter by chapter and doing my best to pre-plan the pacing and structure, in the hopes that I would be able to write it pretty quickly and without too many self-imposed roadblocks. How successful a planner I’ve been will be revealed in due course, I suppose.

So far I’ve written a shade under 500 words. Not very impressive for a first stint, I know, but kicking off at eleven at night is never going to lead to a power-writing session. And 500 is my target daily wordcount for the project, so at least I’m not starting off behind the pace (actually, I am, by eight words, but I’m okay with that).

If all goes to plan, I will be finished the first draft of this sucker by the end of May. In practise it is likely to take a little longer than that, as I still have those outstanding short pieces to finish writing and thence to edit. But as far as possible, I’ll be doing my novel writing first and everything else second each day.

In terms of being tedious on the blog about my process, I’ll probably mention where I’m once in a while, but I’m not planning to post daily word counts or snippets of amusing dialogue.

Right. Time to get to it.

February 16, 2015

Writing goals – The other stuff

Filed under: wordsmithery — Tags: , , — lexifab @ 11:47 pm

The goals I talked about in the last post are what I consider my baseline: the minimum I need to do for me to meet my own definition of a working writer. Without wishing to quibble over definitions, if I get that stuff done, then I know that I’ve been working on my craft (critical to success), contributing to my community (important if incidental) and building a public platform (a necessary evil to support a future career).

But let’s face it: I get bored easily. I crave novelty. I’m not going to be satisfied with diligently knuckling down and doing all the homework I set for myself. To keep myself from going spare as soon as things get boring and/or difficult, I came up with a collection of other projects that I am either hoping to fit into my year or quietly turning over in my head to see how to make them work.


Apart from a few round-robin stories and Lexicon games, I’ve never actually collaborated on any writing project longer than a song. I’ve never co-written a short story, scripted a comic for an artist or a film maker or written a play for live production [1], much less plotted and written a novel with someone. I like working with other people on creative projects. More to the point, I finally feel like I’m at a point in my life where I could stand my collaborator telling me that one of my ideas sucks and we should go in a different direction. Once that would have been a crushing blow to my ego. These days – eh, ideas are easy, and if by chance I disagree about the suckiness of the idea, I can always use it for something else.

One of the things I will be doing this year is looking for opportunities to collaborate. With someone. On something.

Serialised fiction

I keep going back to look at Wattpad, a mobile-friendly platform where tens of thousands of authors post short fiction for readers to consume on their phones. Apart from masses of fan-fiction and fictionalised erotica concerning members of boy bands, Wattpad hosts a large quantity of serialised fiction. Some writers post their draft novels chapter by chapter (in various state of polish from ‘ready to publish’ to ‘might have been spell-checked’) while others just follow the story and see where it takes them.

The idea of writing in full view of the public is in equal parts repellent and fascinating to me. I’ve seen authors discuss using Wattpad as a sort of crowd-sourced critique, which I think would definitely have its pros and cons. I’m personally uncomfortable with the idea of someone watching me as I write, reading over my shoulder and commenting as I go. In trying to imagine what that would be like with even a tiny fraction of Wattpad’s 40 million readers, I’m coming around to the idea that I have to try it, just to see what it’s like.

If I dip my toes in that raging torrent, it will be with some form of serialised fiction – short chapters of a longer piece that might or might not cleave to novel structure, designed to move along at a fast pace and have reusable characters and setting. That’s a kind of writing I feel reasonably confident with, although I would definitely have to work on nailing my endings.

Shared world

I’ve always liked the concept of a shared world, where different writers working from the same core idea, often outlined in a ‘setting bible’, come up with their own storytelling angles. George R R Martin used to be famous for a series called Wild Cards (a modern, realistic take on superhumans before that was its own subgenre) and I’ve always liked the concept if not particularly the execution of the shared world anthology. Which is not to say that I think I could do it better, per se, but it would be interesting to create a source document laying out the world, the tone, the important characters and setting details and see what other people make of it.

I think the only thing stopping me would be working out what to do with it afterwards. Well, that, and coming up with an world sufficiently interesting that anyone else would want to play with it.

Comic script

I mentioned this earlier, but I’ve only ever dabbled secretly in writing comics. I’ve written/drawn a few over the years (none remain!) but I’m pretty sure I’ve never written a straight script to be illustrated (either by me or by someone else). I’d expect to find scripting challenging – a focus on spare dialogue and crisp description doesn’t leave a writer with much to hide behind – but it feels like something that would be worthwhile.


That’s my list of standby projects, in case I suddenly inherit a great wedge of spare time from somewhere. and of course in between all this I’m working, minding kids, doing domestic chore and house renovations, regaining the minimal command of the ukelele I had when I was eleven or so, and doing all that writing stuff I mentioned in the last blog post. Easy!


[1] Actually I kind of did a couple of these back in high school, mainly with my buddies Evan and Chris, but I wasn’t usually the one who took the reins and made anything happen, so I don’t really count those either. Besides which, that was going on thirty years ago…


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