Lexifabricographer For when the right word just won't do…

April 15, 2016

Zine crazy

Filed under: news of the day,wordsmithery — Tags: , — lexifab @ 3:17 pm

I sent a newsletter out last night, to my teeming list of six (count ’em all!) mailing list subscribers. It was a surprisingly nerve-wracking experience, which lines up with my general experience of self-promotion. In other news, I sometimes vomit before or after interviews.

The point of doing the newsletter, even though I don’t really have a lot of writing career to promote at the moment, is to get some practise at the marketing side of the business. It’s an interesting aspect of a professional writing career that I’ve never given any real consideration, for the very sensible reason that why would I? But on the off chance I ever stumble into some modicum of success as a writer, I’d rather have built up some of the basic non-writing skills that prop up the career.

Having a well-maintained mailing list is one of the things every discussion of book marketing mentions sooner or later, whether the author in question is traditional or self-published. Members of a mailing list are self-selecting volunteers who want to be there (if they didn’t, they’d unsubscribe), which makes them more likely to be receptive to your personal news than all your cousins on Facebook or all the random fashion bots that follow you on Twitter.

Besides which, I’ve missed writing wacky amateurish ‘zines, which I’ve hardly done at all since high school.

Another reason included the first episode of what I currently plan to be long-running serial adventure. I figure if I’m going to have a mailing list, I want to make it worth clicking on. It doesn’t hurt that having an outside obligation means I’m much more likely to finish a piece of work than if I leave it to my own devices.

The big reason to put out a newsletter, if I’m being much too blunt for my own comfort [1], is that I crave an audience. I want people to hear what I have to say. Or no, not even that, because the existence of blogs and social media more than adequately provides a soapbox sounding off about whatever. What I really hope for is confirmation, however transitory and slight, that I possess the minor super-power of being entertaining or at least amusing through the medium of storytelling.

I’m like that kid (i.e. me) who ties the towel around his neck, climbs up on the shed and jumps off in the hope that this time he’ll fly. And then does it again, and again, and again. [2]

That sounds self-deprecating and defeatist, but it’s not intended that way. It’s painfully apparent to me, from observation of my own habits as a consumer of art, that it’s very difficult for writers, musicians and artists of every other stripe [2] to capture the attention of an audience, or to hold it for more than a moment. The world is too busy, too loud, too crowded with distractions. It’s hard to stand out. And like all things that are hard, it takes time and work (and probably a lot of mistakes) before you can get better at it.

Don’t get me wrong. I absolutely subscribe to the notion that creating art is a worthwhile pursuit in its own right. But that doesn’t mean I want to or should have to create in a vacuum. Art is much more interesting and compelling to me as a conversation between unique voices than as the isolated mutterings of a lonely madman. Even if the conversation is barely about a murmur at the moment, I’d still prefer to be having it with other people.

Anyway, if you’re reading this and you missed out, you can still go over to my author website and subscribe. I’ll resend the April newsletter in a week or two to any late signups, so you won’t miss out on the first part of Orphans’ Moon.

 

[1] As I typed this I was very, very uncomfortable and maybe a little bit nauseated

[2] And each time, assuming this isn’t the time he breaks his damn fool leg or worse, he gets a little bit better at tucking and rolling on impact.

[3] Poets are especially fucked. I’m glad I’m not trying to be a poet.

March 22, 2016

That did not work

Filed under: administraviata,geekery,news of the day,wordsmithery — Tags: , — lexifab @ 8:42 pm

Boring technical note. I just tried to export this entire blog across to its own page at davidversace.com. It didn’t work.

Or rather, it did work, perfectly – but it merged with the blog that was already there, creating what we might technically refer to as a bit of a dog’s breakfast. I surmise at this point that my best bet is to create a separate website to host this blog, but that will probably take some concerted effort that won’t happen before I head away north for the Easter weekend.

Had another disappointment today, about which I’ll say nothing here, except to note that it means going back to the drawing board for a New Plan.

I now propose to turn my back on the disappointments and go proofread my story in preparation for its publication in At the Edge (details on the Other Site). And then watch an unhealthy amount of Daredevil.

March 15, 2016

Sunday Monday Tuesday Reset

Filed under: news of the day,wordsmithery — Tags: , , , — lexifab @ 9:30 pm

I originally thought that I would run a weekly “keep myself honest” column over at PretentiousAuthor.com. In retrospect I think it would clutter the site up for no particular value for the readers.

It has some value for me, though, so I’m going to do it here instead. I’ll try to keep it short.

What I worked on: I revised the ending of ‘Silver the Moon in Ascension’ (aka ‘Magic robots vs Werewolves: Dawn of Justice’), I hand-wrote a few pages of my story about a monster hunting magistrate, I began researching my story idea for an ecopunk anthology, I wrote a drabble and I sent out my first pretentious-author newsletter to a whopping four subscribers!

I’ve been experimenting in the last few months with doing longhand first drafts. I used to do it, once upon a very long time ago, but I lost the habit somewhere. Early results seem to indicate that I write fast with longhand (not as fast as I type, but also with far fewer pauses for thought), that my writing sprints tend to last no more than about forty minutes at the most, and that I can generally crank out about 300 words (or two-ish pages of my notebook) in ten minutes or so. The prose tends to be a bit overwritten, but not much more than my regular prose. I expect the process of transcription will help me cut the text back to a lean flow. We’ll see.

What I’ve added to my work plan: More longhand drafting on the magistrate story, a knuckle-down redraft of Silver the Moon, writing a short-short submission for a CSFG horror flash fiction contest, more research for the ecopunk story, and outlining my serial fiction project that I plan to start soon.

For reference, the anthology I am aiming at is Ticonderoga’s Ecopunk – speculative tales of radical futures.  I’m inspired to have a go for a few reasons – one, because getting a story accepted into a Ticonderoga anthology has evolved from mere writing goal to authorial white whale; two, because I don’t write enough science fiction and I consider it a real gap in my repertoire; and three, because as I admitted on Leife Shallcross’ blog a few weeks ago, I am a lazy-arsed researcher, which borders on the disgraceful.

(So far the hard part has not been developing a workable SF concept. It’s finding the right story to attach to it).

Taking my shot at a scientifically-plausible short fiction piece is a real personal challenge. Honestly, it’s not a target I expect to hit, knowing the standard that the editors are expecting. But I won’t shore up my weaknesses by avoiding them.

 

 

February 19, 2016

Blogging is dead, so I started another website

Filed under: administraviata,news of the day,wordsmithery — Tags: , , — lexifab @ 8:22 pm

Hot on the heels of a great panel discussion at Wednesday night’s CSFG meeting – summarised neatly by panelist Alis Franklin here at her website – and coinciding with the appearance of my first new piece of published fiction over at EGM Shorts, I have launched my “professional” writing site.

The stunningly original name: davidversace.com (I know, I can’t believe the domain wasn’t taken either!)

Anyway, everyone here already knows this because I talked about it a couple of weeks ago. From this point on I will begin the not-entirely-thought-out process of separating what I want to write about as a “published professional” [1] as opposed to the more personal, everyday stuff. The Lost recaps and occasional book reviews will probably stay here, though.

I still haven’t quite figured out how to migrate the archives here to a semi-hidden spot on my own domain, but that’s still the plan. I’m still not sure if I need some kind of tech support for that.

Anyhow, I’ll be using that site to make any public announcements about upcoming stories or whatever but since I’ll cross-post here as well, you can take your pick which one to look at.

 

[1] Definition to be consumed with salt; your dosage may vary but I would start at a couple of pinches and work up from there.

February 1, 2016

Sneak peek

Filed under: news of the day,the interweb she provides,wombat,wordsmithery — Tags: — lexifab @ 2:17 pm

I am now less than a week away from my next overseas trip for week. I am rather less excited about this than I am anxious.

I might feel differently if I were more confident that the workshops I’ll be running will be valuable and interesting to the people being quietly coerced into attending them. As for me, I get unwanted but necessary public speaking practise, so at least one attendee stands to benefit.

Be that as it may, today is a bit of a personal milestone: the Wombat-child started her kindy year today. As of this morning, I have two children attending the same school at the same time! Up until now our morning commute often involved four stops and took almost exactly an hour with all the doubling back and forth. We might now be down to as little as fifteen minutes. The sheer convenience of only having one morning drop-off and afternoon pickup has barely begun to sink in. I might get back half an hour every morning, to do with as I please! Luxury!

(Yes, I am aware that the two issues above are classic examples of the first-worldiest of first world problems. I don’t have a hell of a lot going on right now!)

Both events mark transition points for me. (The summer holiday in the Hunter was another milestone along the same lines, but it already feels like the sadly distant past). I’ve been preparing for them for months in various ways. In a real sense, it’s not going to feel like 2016 has started until they are both done and out of the way.

All of this is a vast preamble to my point, which is that I am going to launch a new website: davidversace.com

It’s not quite ready for public consumption, but it’s 90% there. It’s a very basic site built around a WordPress frame, in keeping with my current web design, management and coding skills, but it has all the essential elements I believe I’ll need for a simple author web presence. Or platform, if you want to sound cutting-edge-but-last-year.

Before I go out to the big wide world – which is to say, before I post something on Facebook and Twitter and make some changes to my email signature block – I would really appreciate it if everyone reading this could take a look over there. If you see any problems, please leave a comment on this post to let me know. I’m especially keen to know if there are any useability issues, security problems or browser clashes. Even better if you happen to know a solution!

(Don’t leave a comment there yet, please. I’m going to replace the placeholder post with actual content before I go live, so any comments attached to that post will be deleted).

Things I already know about: no author photo, no content on the blog, and the mailing list signup works but does not (yet)  automatically post a “Welcome to my mailing list” message. Oh and I don’t know if the RSS feeds work, but I have no reason to suppose that they don’t. Do people even use RSS feeds any more (I mean, I do, but as you can see from the site my internet-savvy stalled out circa 2009).

Thanks!

January 16, 2016

Near-future projects

Filed under: news of the day,wordsmithery — lexifab @ 7:32 pm

I don’t do New Years’ resolutions (except to get a cheap ironic laugh by breaking them in the same breath) and I’ve decided to hold off on setting myself some firm writing goals for 2016. I was so far off meeting them last year that it doesn’t really make sense to make long term project plans at this point.

Broadly, I’ll be editing the novel and writing as many short stories as I can, launching my new website, and learning a few new skills.

The short stories will take priority. After spending most of last year focused on the one big project, being A Flash of Black Wings (draft one), I am almost desperate to work on anything else for a while. Specifically I’d like to do something with the dozen or so “great” ideas that did their best to derail me whenever I got stuck on the novel. The only way to shut them up, however temporarily, was to chuck them in a notebook filed under “Laterz” and ignore them while I got on with the novel. But the moment the draft was done, they came sniffing around again. They smell weakness.

I’m not sure when I will go back to start work on editing the novel. Not until after I’ve returned from travelling for work in mid-February, at least. It needs a big block of time and unfamiliar brain-space. But I expect the next draft to take at least a few months of dedicated work, just to get it into the right shape that I’m willing to even show it to another human being. At the moment it has a very wobbly structure and the characters are formless voids floating in the vicinity of an incoherent plot. Some remedial work is necessary.

The new website is almost ready, except for a couple of technical bits and pieces that I need to figure out. One of the big items will be working out how to migrate the archives of this blog across to the new site. That will free this site’s host to close it up if he wants to stop paying for it. When I’ve solved all the technical bits I will of course post the new details.

The new site will be my “professional” site, inasmuch as it will be useful to have an author presence that I can separate from my personal life and my occasional moaning about word count. I intend to keep this blog going as a personal journal and place to post reviews, probably as a “hidden” page on the main site. If I can work out how to do it that way. I’ll let you know.

So this is my declaration of goals. In January, of which I have squandered almost half, I will:

  • finish the two stories I have in incomplete states: the one about the magic robots, and the one about the dogged magistrate and the murderous innkeepers. If there’s time, I will rewrite the one about the sinister newlyweds. That was a fun one, even if it didn’t quite work.
  • Launch the new website (with a complete lack of fanfare, but probably a little bit of content).
  • Resume a long-dormant and utterly undemanded review project.

This has all been very boring accountability stuff for myself. So I will also blog a what-I-did-on-my-holidays post, with pictures and stuff.

 

January 1, 2016

2015 – What have we learned?

Filed under: news of the day,wordsmithery — lexifab @ 12:34 am

Goodbye 2015. You were weird.

I started and finished a novel draft inside the year. Despite that accomplishment, I’m not feeling confident that I’ve leveled up as a novelist. I think I must have been expecting to gain some critical insight from the experience of producing this manuscript. I imagined myself figuring out how to write a novel, or at least getting a better understanding of how I write a novel.

Whatever I was expecting, I don’t think I got it. Or perhaps I just don’t have it yet. The editing phase is still to come. I think more than ever before, I’ll be leaning on the editorial process to help me figure out what I was writing about. I’m not especially looking forward to that part, so I can only assume it will be educational and character-building. It will certainly involve wholesale rewriting of between half and two-thirds of the novel.

I didn’t manage to write any new short stories, so I can’t say I learned much there either. I did read quite a few of them, which will be helpful, but it’s the doing that counts. My project for the next month or two will be to get all the ideas out that I’ve been stewing on while writing the novel.

I built a website – it’s coming soon, I swear – so I’m refreshing my atrophied web management muscles (less so the design muscles, but I never had those in the first place). I’m playing music again, which might actually lead up to composing songs. Who knows? That’s just for fun at this stage. I’ve resumed exercising. I’m feeling healthy, if not quite fit again.

And I’m about to go away on holidays, where I’ll be spending a week lounging about and chatting with some very good friends, playing with the kids and swimming and possibly indulging in a spot of tennis. While I’m there I’ll contemplate setting some goals for the year.

Not quite yet, though. First I’m going to drink this G&T and listen to “Disintegration” by The Cure.

Happy 2016, folks.

December 22, 2015

The year in narrow, blinkered retrospect

It’s been a big year for all sorts of stuff, but I’m not going to go into it. Instead, this is my obligatory look back at the goals I set at the start of the year. How did I go and what does that suggest for the future?

Short stories

The promise: I said I was going to maintain my stock of short stories available for submission at a steady level of ten, writing a new one whenever I took one out of circulation through either an acceptance or by retiring a story that had exhausted every viable market.

The reality: Definitively a failure in terms of productivity. In fact after writing my goals in February I did not finish a single short story all year, though I tinkered with a story (crappy working title “Unacceptable Losses”) all year and have left it floundering with probably about three hundred words to go for months now. In theory I could finish it tonight. I probably won’t though.

My stock of available stories went down thanks to three acceptances during the year. None of them have come out yet, though I was able to announce that “Seven Excerpts from Season One” will appear in the At the Edge anthology from Paper Road Press next year.

Acceptances are delightful, of course (all were paying markets) and absolutely what I’m striving for, but I did feel I let myself down a bit by not sticking to the plan of writing new material.

Oh, and I did recently receive notification that I placed highly (a “silver highly commended”) in the most recent round of the Writers of the Future contest. Which is not my best ever result but is still in the front-of-the-peloton zone.

silverhmbadge

Novel

The promise: Write a complete 80,000 word manuscript by the end of July without becoming a gibbering wreck.

The reality: Well, the July deadline came and went without great fanfare. Moreover as at the time of writing I have neither finished the manuscript nor reached the 80,000 word mark. But as I have about 500 words to get to the latter and maybe as little as two thousand words to wrap the whole thing up, I’m going to call this a mismatch between realistic scheduling and sustainable momentum rather than an outright failure. As I am now on holidays for a month, I predict I will at least get this one over the line before the end of 2016. Win!

(And is it any good? Well, no, it’s pretty rambly and largely incoherent. I have a mass of notes on what to fix, and it’s a good bet that the editing process will take at least as long as the first draft did, if not much, much longer. But it’s still nice to be within arm’s reach of the first critical milestone).

Community activity

The promise: Be a good treasurer, write a treasurer manual

The reality: Well, the manual is not finished yet and could do with a bit of dedicated attention for a couple of days, but on the whole I have acquitted myself well in this regard. I’ve been a committee member who gets shit done, and the books all balanced at the end of the year. I don’t tend to be a natural organiser or leader, and basically I find trying to get people to do things or get one the same page as each among the most demanding and draining activities I can imagine. But I can make a spreadsheet make sense, and I can make things happen in the background as long I don’t have to wrangle more than one or two people, so I’ll take this one as an accomplishment.

All the same, I will probably retire from my post at the next AGM, because I will feel I’ve done my bit at that time. Ditto with helping on the Conflux organising committee.

Blogging

The promise: Build a new author website so that I can phase this one out.

The reality: This is 90% done. I haven’t launched it yet, but it is live. Feel free to go look for it (it’s not that hard) but if you do happen to stumble across it, don’t bother subscribing to anything. I’m procrastinating on setting up mail accounts and the newsletter software. It will probably happen in the next couple of weeks.  (It’s not remotely fancy BTW. It’s a functional site with boring author information that I can point potential publishers and clients to if necessary). I haven’t yet sat down to work out a clear plan for what to do with the site beyond that, but it will probably revolve around building on my friendships within the writing community. Hit me up if you’re doing a blog tour, I guess.

The other stuff

Collaboration: Did not happen. The novel ate my year completely. I’m still toying with various ideas for projects but this is one area that would demand focus and attention. At the moment I just can’t even make that sort of promise to myself, so it would hardly be fair to drag someone else down.

Serialised fiction: I made a few plans and outlined some projects that would suit a serialised format, but again, haven’t kicked any of them off yet. There’s one in particular that’s burning a hole in the back of my skull, but it will certainly have to take a back seat to all the short stories I’ve spent the year thinking about but not writing.

Shared world: No. Sensing a theme here? Though in fact I am contemplating ideas for contributing to an existing shared world. Nothing has gelled yet on that, but my contribution would just be a short story or two.

Comic script: See collaboration above.

 

That list doesn’t make for pretty reading, but I’m probably being too harsh on myself. This nearly-done draft novel has taken about nine months, which is an improvement over the thirteen months (twice over) that my previous novel attempt sucked up. Pre-plotting has certainly sped up that process, although one of the many lessons I’ve learned about that is that I could certainly stand to do more preparation next time. I’m reluctantly forced to admit that I am a better writer when I have a clear picture of what I’m going to write, and I suspect that a scene-by-scene breakdown would not go at all astray the next time I try this.

I’ll do a proper “Goals for 2016” post at some point in the near future, but I already know I have a couple of clear goals: write a bunch of short stories, edit the novel, and plan its sequels. In the margins I think I’ll build on one of my serial fiction ideas as the fun side project, but I’m cautious about holding myself to any kind of target on that. This writing biz seems to take a lot more time than I ever think it’s going to.

 

Right. I have a icy cup of creaming soda, a Pandora station tuned to 80’s alternative rock, and five thousand words or so to write in the next nine days.

I can do this.

December 14, 2015

The end of the year

Filed under: fitter/happier,wordsmithery — lexifab @ 4:39 pm

Bloody hell, it’s the middle of December already?

The last few weeks have been outstanding examples of that weird time distortion effect where you have million things to do, and you’re always busy doing them, but the holidays still haven’t arrived yet and when oh god when are you even going to get to slow down and relax?

Maybe that’s just me. Probably not though. I’m seeing a lot of weary-stressed faces around the place.

End of year anxiety is a real thing for me and I guess probably most people. I’m one of those people who measure their lives by the next holiday, or afternoon off, or commitment-free weekend. I don’t lose myself in my day job (I barely comprehend what that would even be like for people whose day job is not “hang out at the waterslide” or “read all these books and tell us when you would like a cup of tea”), so breaks away from the office are much-coveted preciouses which the filthy hobbitses can pry from my cold dead hands.

This year, happily, the anxiety in question is just expressing itself as being really bloody tired all the time, which is inconvenient but a hell of a lot better than being a grumpy stress-head. Where it does hurt is in rebuilding my writing habits. It’s pretty hard to get much momentum if you sit down to write at 8 pm (when the kids go to bed) and you’re nodding off by 9.

Still, my efforts to get something new on paper every day are paying dividends – I’m feeling my way back into the novel, I’m starting to find it easier to figure out what I have to write next, and I’m getting a clearer picture of the (revised) ending I’m working towards. I don’t know why it surprises me every time, but it turns out that the more time I spend thinking about a problem, the clearer the solution tends to become.

So for the next two weeks, my goal is to get the novel draft across the line. I have a nominal word count target of 85,000 words, and I’m somewhere about the 78,000 mark right now. So it’s very achievable, with a bit of concerted effort (especially since it matters less that I make the target than that I get to a point I can attached the words “The End” to).

This is also the time of the year to look back over the goals I set for myself (not to mention the revised ones) and see how I went – what was too ambitious, what was not ambitious enough, and where I lost focus or should never have tried to focus in the first place. I’ll get to that in a couple of weeks, I think, after I wrap up the day job for the year and get through the seasonal festivities (and the first day or so of the Boxing Day cricket test, not that it promises to be a very exciting one).

Season’s greetings, folks.

December 7, 2015

The building of habits

I write best when I write frequently.  I’ve figured that much out about my process [1].

The last few months writing have been like extracting hen’s teeth from an angry wolverine – painful and pointless. I’ve committed maybe a couple of thousand words of new text to paper in about four months. It’s been my longest fallow period since I started taking writing seriously again. (Not, I might add, my longest fallow period ever, for which see the years 1990 to 2002 or so). Certainly it was flat compared to the preceding 18 months though.

The difference was, I let myself have days off from writing – days that turned into weeks and months and would probably have lapsed into years if I didn’t do something. And luckily something came along that helped: a few weeks ago I read this article by Mary Robinette Kowal linking writer’s block to depression. Go read it, it’s a good article.

Now don’t get me wrong – I didn’t and don’t think I was suffering from depression. I am pretty sure I know what that feels like, thanks to several years of undiagnosed sleep apnoea and a sleep debt that could have put a fair-sized dent in a herd of elephants. Maybe I was a clinical case and maybe I wasn’t, but I got a clear enough glimpse of the real thing to know its general shape. But the article did give me a none-too-gentle slap across the face, woke me up and made me ask myself: “Is there something wrong?”

Even though I wasn’t writing much if at all, the idea that I had writer’s block never quite occurred to me until I read the article. And yet MKR’s list of typical expressions of writer’s block – the tiredness, the procrastination, the busywork and the general faffing about – were a straight checklist of all the avoidance behaviours I’ve been steadily accumulating since I stopped writing. That was back around the start of August.

I realised the obvious at once, which is that I had lost all momentum. I need momentum as a writer. I need to feel like I’m building steadily, getting faster and sharper and…you get the idea. When I don’t have that momentum, the gravity’s a killer. When I have to pick myself up and get going after coming to a dead stop, I feel like Jon Snow at the foot of the Wall, wondering how in the hell I’m going to get over the top, knowing there’s an army of ice zombies at my back.

I may have carried that analogy too far. Or maybe not far enough. It’s more like I’m the ice zombie, but in that case I’m not sure how to work the Wall into this and anyway never mind that right now.

MKR’s article also included several elements of what I hope will be the solution to freezing up mid-shamble (Stop that!)

First – Mary’s article mentions Habitica, a very basic roleplaying web app that effectively gamifies habit-building behaviour. Down at its core, Habitica’s core gameplay is building checklists and then ticking things off. Boring and artificial as that sounds – and is! – it’s an idea that works very well for me. I’m someone that responds strongly to making lists of things to do and then methodically ticking them off. To put it another way, an unfinished list of even trivial importance is a source of anxiety to me. So a game that rewards me for checking stuff off and sits there glowing judgmentally redly when I don’t is an embarrassingly effective brain hacking tool.

As a bonus, slavish adherence to checklists also encourages me to make sure I get all the other work around the house done as fast as possible.

Second – I’m back to exercising. I have a fairly light workout routine that mostly works the abdominal core. It only takes a few minutes and I can easily do it a couple of times a day. Supplemented with walks of thirty-plus minutes, which I manage a few times a week, I have a decent basis for at least building a bit of strength and endurance, if not necessarily shedding the winter kilos. It’s a tone-up, not a crash course in muscle building and cardio bullshit. Keeping it tight.

Third – At my height, I was writing 750 or more words per day. When I stopped, that dropped to not much more than a couple of hundred words on the few days I could manage anything at all. In the months when I was blocked, I would berate myself for not coming even close to what I knew to be an achievable target. But what I’d forgotten is that it took me months of gradually acceleration to get to that pace. It was deeply unrealistic of me to expect that I could just tool up to top speed without starting in first gear again. I’d stall, and be surprised and disappointed in myself, instead of acknowledging that stalling is the only outcome I should have expected.

So I’m giving myself a break – 100 words a day. I know that as I ease myself back into the habit of daily writing, I’ll start cranking out more. But I’ll start with the consistency, because I know that it works for me.

Fourth – I’m playing musical instruments. I have access to ukuleles and a bass guitar. I’m teaching myself how to play them using fingering charts and Youtube videos. It’s surprisingly fulfilling, even if my fingers hurt very much at the moment.

So that’s me. That’s my summer planned out. I’m getting my words back, I’m going to finish this damn first draft of the novel, and I’m going to replenish my short story stocks. And I’m going to be able to play along to the Gorillaz’ “Feelgood Inc”, even if it costs me a finger or two.

 

[1] I promise not to describe it as a process again, at least not until I finish my MFA and the lobotomy bandages have been removed.

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