Lexifabricographer For when the right word just won’t do…

November 5, 2013

TMoRP Day 12 – The short stories of March

None of the stories I read in March seem to have made a lasting impression on me. Still, looking over my list I see that there are quite a few that struck me as high quality yarns without being life-changing events, so I hereby dedicate this TMoRP entry to a handful of stories I thought were well worth a read.

The reliable Beneath Ceaseless Skies magazine website gave us the extravagantly-entitled “The Traitor Baru Cormorant, Her Field-General, and Their Wounds” by Seth Dickinson. It’s a tense, uncomfortable story about the final test of loyalty of a bureaucrat who led and betrayed a rebel uprising against an oppressive Throne. The titular character’s battle-inflicted left-side brain damage has left her oblivious to the right side of her world, an injury she employs to great effect to ignore the inconvenient parts of her difficult situation. Re-reading it this morning has bumped it up in my estimation. It’s a fine examination of the two sides of leadership qualities – strength and moral character versus selfishness and cruelty – and the necessity for both.

In March I read the previous CSfG anthology, Winds of Change, edited by Elizabeth Fitzgerald and available now in ebook format (sorry – as a new CSfG council member, I feel a small obligation to plug the wares). I consumed the anthology across the month, and while it’s a strong collection in general, I recommend it for a few stories in particular: ‘Wraiths’, by Jason Nahrung, set in a spirit-blighted post-apocalyptic Australia; ‘The Tether of Time’, Leife Shallcross’ mythic variant of the Flying Dutchman legend; and the late James Goodrum’s haunted-child story ‘By Watcher’s Pool’. Those are just the ones that stood out in my mind, though – WoC, like Next, is a fat volume that represents an excellent cross-section of Australia’s speculative fiction scene.

Finally I have to give a shout-out to Lisa Hannett’s ‘Sweet Subtleties’, which is probably the only piece of confectionery-based erotic speculative fiction you are ever likely to encounter. It’s beautiful, grotesque, absurd and difficult to describe in terms of plot: Una is a sentient or possibly haunted sculpture crafted by the confectioner Javier over and over again, for the amusement and consumption of decadent and sometimes depraced clients. It’s one of those stories that is not outright horror, but still finds several different ways to be upsetting, but fascinating and memorable with it. I listened to a reading by Kate Baker on the Clarkesworld Podcast, but it’s also there to read on the website.

June 20, 2013

Writing Watch – Short story markets

Okay, before I start, I *am* still working on my novel. But I’m at the horrible late-middle stage where nothing is working properly and I can’t see a clear path (yet) to the ending. It’s doing my head in and all I can think as I work on it is: This story is not coming out how I imagined it in my head. Nothing I’m doing is working. I’ve wasted two years on this steaming heap of garbage and it’s still not readable. I hate writing!

Yes, it gets that bad at times. My brain is a stupid, self-defeating thing. It’s slightly heartening to know that other, more successful writers have similar problems – read this excellent depressing essay by the rather-good Libba Bray about her current work in progress – but that doesn’t help me out of my quagmire.

So I am regrouping and trying some new writing tactics. One of these is to work on a short story at the same time, so that rather than allow myself to stall because I am frustrated with the novel, I can switch modes quickly and still feel like I’m making some progress. Later (in the same writing session or the next) I can come back to the novel with fresh eyes and a calmer attitude. maybe. I dunno. It’s an experiment.

Anyhow, I’m taking the opportunity to list a few short story opportunities for Australian writers that are open at the moment. There are many more, of course, these are just some that have an appeal to me at the moment. Since I appear to have an invisible readership – HELLO IMAGINARY FRIENDS LEAVE A COMMENT – I figure they might also be of broader interest. If not, well at least I have the links handy.

Gold Coast Anthology – Canberra editor Elizabeth Fitzgerald and honourary Canberran Helen Stubbs are editing an anthology of short stories about the Gold Coast, available to authors who live at or have ever visited the Gold Coast. They have a large collection of photographs both modern and historical from the region. Every submission must be based on (at least) one of the photos. Any genre, up to 5000 words, submissions close 31 August.

Kisses by Clockwork – Ticonderoga Publications, who are one of the premier Australian spec fiction small publishers (in admittedly not that large a field) are doing a collection of romantic steampunk stories. Ticonderoga’s anthologies are rather intriguing – last year’s One Thousand and One Nights-styled Dreaming of Djinn is on my to-read pile – and of quite a high standard. Specific genre, 2000 to 7500 words, submissions by 15 October.

This is the one I’m working on now, writing the story while at the same time attempting to overcome my limited familiarity with the genre by poring through, I kid you not, The Mammoth Book of SteamPunk (which is proving itself to be quite an entertaining anthology in its own right).

Finally, Dimension6 will be an in-house journal of novella-length science fiction from Australian publisher Couer de Lion. Publisher Keith Stevenson is pretty open about D6 being a promotional tool for CDL’s other products, but I’ve read Anywhere but Earth and most of the stories from X6 – a novellanthology and on the basis of those I’d be happy to recommend their works. They aren’t reading submissions until January 2014 so there’s plenty of time to get something to them. Unusually D6 will have a minimum word length – 4500 words – because as Keith says “we believe a real story needs at least that much space to thrive”. And why not?

Powered by WordPress