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February 6, 2016

Back to the Island 3.4 – Every Man for Himself

Filed under: back to the island,reviewage — Tags: , , — lexifab @ 7:00 am

Bless me Internet, for I have committed the sin of allowing a blogging project to stall. It has been (nearly) a year since my last episode of Lost, and it was the better part of a half a year before that one.

By now you’ve all finished watching it, right?

Well, whatever, I think we’re beyond all understanding of why I’m doing these recaps, but it is still fun to go back once in a while and see what’s going on. I plan to persevere with the Back to the Island project, however intermittently I update it, if for no other reason than I have only ever watched the final season once. I really want to address my mixed feelings about it, but by now I think I can only really engage with it in terms of the rest of the series. Hence this painfully slow rewatch process.

But hooray, today we have one of my favourite episodes of Season Three, which is delightful even if nothing much actually happens.

* * *

Back to the Island 3.4 – Every Man for Himself

Quote: “Congratulations Ford. You just lied and cheated your way out of prison. You’re a free man.” – Warden Harris

Summary: Desmond begins to discover he has the ability to see impending disasters before they happen. The Others coerce Jack into committing acts of emergency surgery, and trick Sawyer into not escaping by telling him he’s got a bomb where his heart was. They say it more convincingly than that.

Best Part: Ben and the Others convince Sawyer that they have put a booby-trapped pacemaker in his chest so that if he gets too excitable his heart will explode. It’s plausibly implausible in exactly the same way that the best episodes of Leverage – another show about conman hijinks – always are.

Worst Part: Oh, and there it is – the first appearance of fucking Paulo. I mean, at this point he’s just another scruffy hunk playing golf on the beach, but soon he’ll be a hateful waste of half a season’s plot lines. Welcome to the party, Paulo! Here his scene is rescued by being mercifully brief and containing generous portions of dishy, mysteriously Scottish Desmond.

Books: Sawyer, imprisoned in the flashback, is reading Of Mice and Men. The bookage is not subtle in this one. In the terrific final scene, Sawyer thinks he’s being marched to his execution and quotes the rabbit-obsessed OM&M character Lennie. Ben reveals they conned him into cooperating: “Your heart’s not going to blow up James. The only thing we put inside you was doubt.” He twists the knife in, psychoanalysing Sawyer’s relationship with Kate with a two-fisted counter-quote from Of Mice and Men. Sawyer cops it right on his secret hidden sensitive side.

The mythology: Ben’s white rabbit has a number 8 stencilled on its back, which as a callback to prior Island mythology is only slightly more ostentatious than the fact that it is a white rabbit.

Summary: Plot-wise, this episode takes the tiniest step forward imaginable. In essence, Colleen dies of the gunshot wound that Sun gave her back on the boat (Jack, incidentally, loses another patient on the table, and if that’s not a prompt for a drinking game I don’t know what is) and her husband Danny is angry about it. Meanwhile, Desmond tries to be nonchalant about discovering hitherto-unmentioned psychic – or should I say “clairvoyant”? – powers. He saves Claire despite her crushing inability to take a hint.

Despite the miniscule forward momentum, this is one of my favourite episodes of the season. Nearly everyone gets at least one great scene, though Jack and Juliet downplay theirs so hard they might as well be acting in a trench. But Sawyer, Kate and Ben are all in fine form, scheming and emoting at each other. It’s a fine character piece that begins to shows us some of the more enduring chinks in hard-bitten-softie Sawyer’s considerable emotional armour. Some of Lost‘s main characters suffer badly from the show’s gimmick of regularly going back and expanding their back-story, but I don’t count Sawyer among them.

Also, Bill Duke as a menacing, emotionless prison Warden is just superb casting and a credit to everyone involved in the decision. I give this nine out of ten rabbits with an infinity symbol ominously painted on their backs.

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