Lexifabricographer For when the right word just won’t do…

March 9, 2015

Back to the Island 3.3 – Further Instructions

Filed under: back to the island,reviewage — Tags: , , , , — lexifab @ 11:32 pm

Well, I nearly made it six months without a single entry in the world’s least essential recap of history’s most-recapped television program, but here we find ourselves once again. There are various reasons why I’ve not been more regular in maintaining this series, but if I’m honest one of the big ones is that we have come to one of the least-rewatchable parts of the series. That is, the sequence leading up to the infamous 2006 Hollywood writers’ strike, during which, according to legend, the producers Carlton Cuse and Damon Lindeloff actually sat down and figured out where the hell they were going with the series, which was by this point among the most popular forms of entertainment on the planet.

On the one hand, I sympathise with them having to make the tough transition from discovery writers, working out what the story is through the process of telling it, to being architects who have to plot out the story in minute detail. I’ve been there, albeit not with a production employing hundreds of people, watched by many millions more and costing hundreds of millions of dollars.

The strike came along at more or less the last possible minute to save the show from collapsing under the weight of its own unaddressed mythology (though there are plenty of critics out there who would argue that it sailed well past that point somewhere around the third act of ‘Pilot’). Unfortunately it came too late to save the first half of Season Three from being a hopeless dog’s breakfast of new characters (some better-judged than others), new manifestations of Island-magic craziness and some very bad character decisions made for plot-advancement purposes.

This is one of those episodes, and as you’ll see, I didn’t care for it so much.

 

Back to the Island 3.3 – Further Instructions

“Yeah, I know, I get it, you’re going to go into your little magic hut and I’m going to stay out here in case you devolve into a monkey.” – Charlie Pace

Summary: Locke, inexplicably struck dumb by the explosion of the Swan Station, goes on a vision quest to rescue Mr Eko from a polar bear.

The Best Bit: This episode marks the first appearance of third-season-rescuing new characters Nikki and Paolo, who are – wait, no, that’s not the best bit at all. Well, instead we’ll celebrate the return to the polar bears in a stunning bit of visual effects that – oh, no. No they’re not.

Huh. Well, look, Desmond gets around naked for most of the episode, so I imagine there must be someone who’s happy about it.

The Worst Bit: In expanding the character of Locke, this episode massively diminishes him. “Psych profile said you’d be amenable to coercion,” undercover cop Eddie tells him in the flashback. Pretty sure they meant “deception” or “transparent lies”, but the incorrect word is a script editing problem. The problem for the show is that it’s one thing to have Locke doubt his interpretation of events and the decisions he makes, but it’s another to hang the character trait of “gullible nitwit” on him.

There have been cases on inconsistent characterisation on the show before, but this one finally marks the point at which Locke is basically no longer a viable protagonist. In establishing his vulnerability to being conned by anyone with a convincing-sounding story, it’s at this point that we can give up the concept of reliable narration for any scene in which Locke is the POV character. From now until the end of the show, the only times we know Locke understands the situation correctly is when he is screaming about being cheated or tricked or taken advantage of yet again.

On the other hand, drugging up and going on a sweat-lodge hallucinogenic dream-quest is *totally* consistent with Locke’s character. What a pity it’s such a tedious (and cheaply-filmed) dream sequence back in the airport. (Hi Boone! Nice to see you again! Still nobody cares that you’re dead).

The Mythology: The Island plays its regular trick of appearing as a dead character in order to impart wisdom or guidance to the living, albeit in this case Boone’s appearance gets a non-magical makeover as a heatstroke-induced hallucination. More interesting is the first hint that something is up with Desmond’s perception of time, with his precognition about Locke’s speech. Like everything else in the episode, though, this revelation is slathered with so much significance that it sacrifices any subtlety or meaning.

The Episode: Some episodes are about moving the plot along, and some episodes are about setting things up for later. This one is almost the latter, but it’s treading water so hard it’s practically levitating. This episode is so obvious and plodding that it borders on the crass – Ghost-Boone’s narky, timewasting name-check of each of the Oceanic survivors in the airport dream sequence is an insult to the clever, layered uses of dreams that have gone before in the series.

Locke’s usefulness as a character is thrown under the bus in order to reposition him as a useful stooge for whichever bad guy next pops his head up out of the Island, and a potential antagonist for anyone with any sense. If Locke is the avatar of faith in Lost’s central philosophical debate, this this episode looks remarkably like it was a fix on behalf the “rationalism” side.

Basically, it’s garbage, even if they did let Dominic Monaghan get in sly references to Altered States and The Lord of the Rings. Two out of ten fingers smeared with trippy homemade peyote.

September 3, 2014

Back to the Island 3.1 – A Tale of Two Cities

Filed under: back to the island,reviewage — Tags: , , — lexifab @ 2:42 pm

Back to the Island 3.1 – A Tale of Two Cities

“I don’t think you’re stupid, Jack. I think you’re stubborn.” – Juliet Burke

Summary: Jack, Kate and Sawyer are prisoners of the Others, who live in a nice Dharma Initiative village

The Best Bit: In an episode centering on how much of a stubborn, obsessive arsehole Jack Shepherd is, the best bit is, as you’d expect, something Sawyer does. Specifically, Sawyer’s cranky struggle with the weird Skinner-box animal cage he’s been put in, his triumph at ingeniously solving it using lateral thinking, his disappointment that his reward is a Dharma fish biscuit, and his utter deflation when Tom Friendly tells him that “it only took the bears two hours” to solve it.

The Worst Bit: Okay, at this point, do we really need yet another insight into how Jack is a stubborn, obsessive arsehole? He single-handedly destroyed his own marriage and, for an encore, drove his recovering-alcoholic father back to the bottle that eventually killed him? Bra-fucking-vo, heroic leading man Jack!

The Mythology: This episode is all about the tease – the Others’ were all minding their own business, baking muffins, reading books and fixing plumbing when Oceanic 815 crashed. They live in a Dharma facility but “that was a long time ago”. They seem to have access to impressive resources – Juliet had Jack’s life story in her file, which they seem to have put together in just a few weeks despite being on some uncharted island in the South Pacific. Just what exactly do they do all along, and why have they been pretending to be murderous ninja-hobos all this time? Mysterious! Oh, and it turns out that “Henry Gale” is really a guy called Ben, who is probably the Others’ leader.

The Literature: Juliet’s book club is reading Stephen King’s “Carrie”, which one member dismisses as trash that, intriguingly, “Ben wouldn’t read on the toilet”. It’s Juliet’s favourite book, so the other club members must have been disappointed to be robbed of a good literary stoush by the sky turning weird and a plan exploding overhead. The other literary reference is the title, but for once I’m stumped. Is it referring to LA and Sydney? They are hardly mentioned. And there’s the Oceanic survivors on one side and the Others on the other side, but that’s kind of a long bow to draw. I hereby accuse the producers of wedging a gratuitous literary reference in for no reason whatsoever.

The Episode: It’s all setup, from the flashback of Jack being a destructive, life-ruining arse to the present where Jack is being a destructive, life-ruining arse. Juliet is introduced as a smart woman with a lot of very strong emotions she is working hard to suppress. Weaselly manipulator Henry Gale is reintroduced as Ben, a ruthless manipulator and the leader of the Others. Tom Friendly is reintroduced as, well, a friendly guy who doesn’t mind administering the odd clinical beating. And Kate, we are stunned to learn, wears a summer dress well and has a great line in upset stares when Ben tells her that “the next two weeks are going to be very unpleasant”. We also meet Carl, but it’s safe to say it will be some time, if ever, before we care about Carl.

The episode is okay. The opening scene with Juliet popping open a CD and having an unsettling emotional breakdown to the tune of Petulia Clarke’s “Downtown” is a nice callback to Season 2’s opening scene with Desmond. With only three of the principal characters present, and spending most of their time in cages of one sort or another, it’s not the most action-packed episode, but it does have some nice psychological drama elements. Juliet is presented as someone who has learned to survive in Ben’s company by controlling herself carefully and playing some of the same mindgames we’ve come to love from him. Sawyer is concerned with living in the moment and surviving, reflected by his incarceration in an animal cage. Kate is required to do nothing, literally, but to look pretty in this episode. And Jack is, as always, an arrogant, self-obsessed arse.

Seven fish biscuits, and we really need to cut Jack out of this diet.

Powered by WordPress